Forward-looking‧Professional‧International 
June 2011  
Commodity price and the Japanese quake shake manufacturers' confidence in April
While inflation risk dampens service sector sentiment
The global economic recovery continues to fuel Taiwan’s external sector growth. On Year-on-Year basis, exports grew by an impressive 24.6%, or USD 27.32 billion, an eighteen month expansion run. The bullish YoY export growth was mainly fuelled by demands in electronic and communication products. On Month-on-Month basis however, export growth was more modest, at just over 0.3%. Import growth also remained strong, due to both consumption growth upturn as well as increase in commodity imports. Imports of consumer goods grew by 26.0% while commodity imports grew by 31.5% with a total import growth of 25.7%, or USD 24.36 billions in April.

While both exports and imports value showed robust performances, trade surplus in April showed a strong growth of 16.3%%, or USD 2.96 billions. Cumulative trade data for the first four months of 2011 saw impressive growth with exports grew by 20.8% and imports by 22.8%. Cumulative trade surplus for the first four months of 2011 saw a 0.5% growth YoY, or USD 7.51 billion. The relative low surplus growth was due to the surge of imports and not a reflection of Taiwan’s external trade sector.

Industrial production also experience sustained growth in April. With increased in demands for the electronic products, industrial production grew -5.61% Month-on-Month and 6.85% on Year-on-Year basis. The relative strong YoY performance suggests a strong cyclical upturn and increasing demands for new consumer electronics products while the weak MoM data is due to both seasonal factors and the 3/11 Japanese Tsunami shock. Among the individual sectors, the manufacturing sector increased by 7.09% in April, the production of electricity, natural gas and water output went up by 1.95% and 1.27% respectively.
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Taiwan expects the increase of Chinese tourists to boost 400,000 job opportunities
The Taiwan Government deregulates its Chinese tourism policies, which takes effects on June 28th this year. Currently, Chinese tourists are only allowed to travel in Taiwan in groups. The Chinese tourists are expected to help generate about 400,000 jobs in Taiwan, especially in tourism-related industries.

AmCham: Taiwan needs to expand its trade with other economies besides China to improve Taiwan's business climate
AmCham released their 2011 Taiwan White Paper in June, which provides concrete suggestions to Taiwan's Government in order to boost economic development amidst existing challenges. AmCham Chairman Bill Wiseman believes that Taiwan is relying too heavily on China, and should have its broader trade to other large economies like the U.S. and EU for securing some kind of trade agreement.

IMD ranks Taiwan as the 6th most competitive country in its 2011 World Competitiveness Yearbook
The Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) aims to improve its overseas Taiwanese company services by establishing a service centre
The Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) plans to establish an intellectual property bank to strengthening its IPR protection.
The Ministry of Economic Affairs's (MOEA) introduces a new online application service to improve its new company establishment procedures
Taiwan Economic Research Monthly
Taiwan's new economic era post the Taiwan-China trade pact (ECFA)
Opportunities and challenges of the ECFA and Taiwan's logistics industry
Taiwan's perspective medical service industry in China's market post the ECFA
Closer Cross-Strait cooperation and what it means to Taiwan's telecommunication industry?
The new tourism blueprint in the post-ECFA Taiwan
Taiwan's financial and banking sectors in the midst of China's political changes
Outlook of Taiwan's catering sector with increased China's tourists
Taiwan's service sector strategies to generate franchises in China
Outlooks of Taiwan's information service sector in China's market
Benefits of the ECFA and Taiwan's exhibition industry
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